Nostalgia: Past Perfect, Present Tense

More than ten years ago, a good friend, Glen Davis, told me to always remember that nostalgia is like grammar. In the past, it’s perfect, but the present is tense. I should have remembered that.

Back in high school, I read a humorous book. I remember laughing my head off while reading it. I also remembered that there was at least one more book in the series. Problem was that a few weeks ago, I couldn’t remember the title. I thought and thought, and remembered a unique concept in the book. A little googling on “cineverse” turned up the title: Slaves of the Volcano God. And I saw there were two more books in the series!

The only question was how to get the books to read them. We are members of a book trading club called Paperbackswap. After checking, they had both books. I ordered them from other members.

Like I said, I should have remembered Glen’s advice. I’ve read the second book in the series, but am stalling out on the third. It’s an okay trilogy, but I’m not laughing as much as I remembered. Of course, more than 20 years should account for something.

The jokes are falling flat to me. Every chapter rotates point of views. It’s getting hard to keep track of the number of characters, where they are from, and what they need to do. The most unfortunate part is that it spoils the memory. I used to smile on those few occasions that I thought about the cineverse. I don’t now.

Just keep that in mind. Nostalgia is like grammar. The past is perfect but the present is tense.

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About frankluke

Professionally: pastor, programmer, writer. Personally: husband, father.
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